GradSWE Overseas, Liberia

L-SWE SUCCESS: The Miracle You Searched For

This is our first guest post from L-SWE! The author is Edith Tarplah, a junior student at University of Liberia and President of L-SWE.

edith

People search for miracle in places they feel it might exist, but fail to realize that at the time the miracle they wish is starring them in the face.
Having a group of female engineers coming together despite their diversities in their field of study and in their lives as a person, to organize a camp that will mold minds and lives of undergraduate female engineering students in Liberia is like a long awaited miracle that many have searched for.
It is difficult to be a female student in Liberia, yet alone say an engineering female student. As a student you need series of activities in your school life that will encourage you to continue even though it is difficult to get funding, but instead you are faced with frustrations on a daily basis. These make you go to school because you have to, not because you want to.
Thus having other female engineering students giving up their time to come to Liberia to encourage and promote networking amongst engineering student and professionals, giving students the opportunity of having a one-on-one conversation about their field of studies and how things actually work in the real world is a miracle.

The big question is “Will students realize that their miracle is here? Or will they keep searching?”

Personally my journey of realizing my miracle started a few months ago when the UM graduate students came to Liberia for two weeks to build the foundation for the L-SWE SUCCESS camp. They organized a professional interactive dinner for engineering students and professionals which was a success. I got acquainted with many engineering professionals because of that dinner, who are people that I contact on a regularly to seek professional advice.

edith working

The organizers of the L-SWE success camp have made it a point to help students recognize opportunities and show them how to make maximum use of it. This is done through sessions and social activities amongst the students and supervisors. It is because of these sessions I got to know the difference between getting masters and a PhD ( something so common that one will laugh if they come to hear that a fourth year university student cannot tell the difference). It might be funny, but it is the truth. Through these sessions I have also learned that the root cause of the educational hazards in Liberia is the lack of funding. Due to the low funding, the Ministry of Education has to lobby around for funds before getting some of their projects implemented, which causes delay in the school system leading to a sub-standard curriculum.
Now that I know the root cause, I see and explain things differently.
The loads of information I’m gaining in this camp, gives me a whole new level of confidence to continue my studies and even aim for a higher goal. It has also helped me learn how to value myself and have a open mind about things that may come my way.
Thus L-SWE SUCCESS camp is my miracle I searched for. What is yours?

GradSWE Overseas, Liberia

L-SWE SUCCESS Day 4: Bottle Rockets!

Today was a day dedicated to completing our first engineering activity! Each of the teams were build their own bottle rocket, and compete against other groups to see whose design was the best. The theme of the weekend is “working together”, to focus attention on group dynamics and effective teamwork in engineering.

LSWE bottle rocket team

At 9am, we setup the materials for bottle rockets. After breakfast, all the teams came in to grab their materials and get to work. After about an hour of prepping, we took a break to welcome our first guest speaker of the camp.


 

Peace Corps Liberia Training Director Zayzay Miller (left) and Peace Corps volunteer, Kris (right).

Zayzay Miller is the Training Manager of Peace Corps Liberia. His office trains new Peace Corp volunteers, coordinates volunteer assignments, and manages the Peace Corp properties. He came to talk to the L-SWE women, however, about his previous work as a volunteer in the Liberian Youth Corps. He shared his experience as one of the first cohort of Youth Corps members, which functions similar to AmeriCorp in the US, where young people who are college graduates commit 2 years to serve in communities in need. Zayzay encouraged students to think about alternative career paths after graduating from college, since the employment situation in Liberia is rather bleak and it could be difficult to get jobs straight out of school with no prior work experience.

It was interesting to hear about the Peace Corps work, and the national volunteer service that it inspired. Most of the us had no idea what the Youth Corps were before the talk, and it seemed like it could be a great opportunity for people to gain practical skills in engineering, and also in community organizing around engineering projects.


 

group of students measuring and cuttingAfter Zayzay’s talk, and a Q&A, the bottle rocket building resumed. The goal for the teams were to get a rocket that spent the longest time in the air between launch and hitting the ground. Teams worked diligently all afternoon, just barely taking a break for lunch.

Since we could only use the limited materials the UM team had brought in our luggage, the teams had to be conservative about the materials they used for their rockets. It was quite an ordeal actually to get the right bottles for the rockets– we had to find sodas in plastic bottles in the market that were roughly the right shape and size for a rocket. The logistics team was planned ahead, and we recycled the bottles from the drinks provided at orientation to use for the rockets. However, it was a constant battle with the hyper-efficient cleaning staff at the camp to keep the bottles from getting thrown out. Sahithya tried valiantly to distinguish the stash of empty bottles from other trash in the room, but on Friday morning we were bested by an early morning trash sweeper. After the first batch of bottles were thrown out, we bought more Coke and Fanta bottles, but the Fantas turned out to be too round at the top once teams started crafting their rockets. So we had to go out and get Coke and Sprites. Eventually, each team had enough materials to make two rockets, either to test two different designs or to use as a prototype and a competition model.

woman watching youtube videoThe night before, the students had eagerly looked up Youtube videos of bottle rockets to get an idea about what they trying to do. From there, ingenuity abounded. Teams got to test launch their rockets later in the afternoon, and even though it was raining, the teams stayed outside testing and tweaking their models for hours. Most of the teams got good launches and a strong vertical start, but all the teams struggled to get their rocket’s parachute to deploy. Since getting the parachute to deploy would greatly increase their time in the air, the teams worked really hard to refine their designs to get that parachute done. Next week, we’ll do the competition, and we’ll see who’s design works the best!

 

two girls working together
Designing the Bottle Rockets

 

Getting ready to test launch the rocket, as Sahithya supervises

 

group watching a bottle rocket fly
Successful Launch!
LSWE Lappa
GradSWE Overseas, Liberia

L-SWE SUCCESS Day 1: Orientation

images of LSWE swagOn Wednesday, we welcomed the Liberian students to the camp. They came from across Monrovia and the surrounding areas, and all are undergraduates at the University of Liberia, Stella Maris University, and St. Clements University College.

L-SWE swag on a table

As we waited for them to arrive, the UM team unpacked our materials and setup the classroom where we would be conducting most of the seminars and activities. A few of the Liberian members of the Logistics team, along with the undergraduate SWE members took a trip to the market to gather some last additional materials for an engineering activity later in the week.

The students came in two waves, with one bus (shepherded by “Boss Lady” Edith) arriving in the morning just before lunch, and the second arriving just before dinner. To get to know each other and start the camp off right, we spent the afternoon playing games to learn each other’s names and share a little bit of culture.

lswe participants standing under the flags L-SWE SUCCESS at the Peace Corp Training Center in Kakata, Liberia

LSWE participants playing Liberian games

lswe participants watching a game

LSWE participants playing cards

My favorite, was Lappa: similar to dodgeball, but instead of only concentrating on avoiding the ball you also have to match up and straighten a pile of shoes. When you get hit, you tag in another person from your team, relay style, and they continue the straightening effort. When you finish straightening, you count the shoes (all of them, before the other team interrupts you by throwing the ball). When you run out of players to tag in, the round is over and the teams switch places.   

After an afternoon of games, we started orientation in the evening. After introducing the camp and its purpose, every planning team gave a short presentation about their part of camp logistics. Some students opted to join a couple of the planning teams to continue helping out with camp throughout the next couple weeks. It looks like it will be a great few weeks!

group photo on first day of SUCCESS camp
Yay for the first day!

 PS: Here’s where we are…

map of Kakata, Liberia, West Africa

6 members of the UM team
GradSWE Overseas, Liberia

L-SWE SUCCESS: Now now*!

*”Now now”: Liberian english for right now… like, really we actually did it this time. Now now!

Cold showers. Spicy spaghetti. Cloudy skies. Sunny smiles. An afternoon of children’s games. Wifi!!
So starts the first day of the L-SWE Success Camp! We were so excited. Finally, after over two years of anticipation, preparation, and a few setbacks, the leadership camp for women engineering students in Liberia was finally underway. We’ll chronicle our experience over the next few weeks on this blog, as well as our Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram accounts.
How We Got Here…
It’s kinda a long story– read our previous posts about the very beginning.
In this chapter, the U-M team arrived on Tuesday evening in Liberia after over a day and a half of travel. stacks of suitcases

Starting in Ann Arbor, the trip started at 9:00am on Monday with 6 of us packing up two SUVs worth of luggage– a personal bag each, plus supplies, giveaways, and– of course– snacks. After some Tetris!-worthy packing, we set off for what would be a five hour drive to Chicago, one of the few airports in the U.S. that accepts travelers from Liberia.

Fortified by Maggie’s scones, we beat Chicago rush hour to arrive at the airport with just enough time to check our 12 pieces of it’s-only-51lbs-please-don’t-charge-me bags and boxes, return the rental SUVs, and get all twelve of us through security in time for boarding. Our flight to Brussels took off on time at 5:55, wonderfully half full because a connecting flight was delayed. (bad for them, good for us!) After a bumpy 7 hours, we arrive in Brussels around 8am, where we met Allisandra, coincindentally doing laps around the terminal to stretch her legs. Most of the team had never met Bre or Allisandra in person before the day of the flight, but somehow it was like we’d been together all along.

After a couple hours wait, we boarded the plane for Liberia, and after another 5 hours, landed safely in Monrovia.

6 members of the UM team
The U-M team with feet on the ground in Liberia! L->R: Maggie, Bri, Jasmine, Liz, and Melinda

Somehow, we lost Allisandra as soon as we got off the plane. IMG_8456 But the airport had only one gate, so we were pretty sure we would find her at some point. We all got through immigration and customs with no problems (it might’ve helped that we had USAID prominently duct taped to all our boxes).

We were reunited with Allisandra outside, who had been rescued by Sahithya and Edith, who had been waiting outside with the bus we would be using for the camp. We also bid farewell to Allison, who unfortunately had to cut her trip short to return home to be with her family (see Allison and Sahithya’s post about the L-SWE Advance Team!).
With all our luggage packed on the bus, we rode into the sunset (literally!)

back of a truck at nightOn a personal note, it was surreal for me to finally be on Liberian soil. After having traveled to Sierra Leone in 2013, being back in region felt like returning to a familiar place. The air, the trees, the houses, the people– it all seemed so comfortable, as if I had never left. I hardly felt like I had left the US, although the palm trees and “Ebola is real” signs everywhere beside buckets of soap and water indicated otherwise.

We picked up several of the Liberian students on the camp planning committee on our way to our campground.

“Boss Lady” Edith picks us up at the airport in the L-SWE bus

Sara and Sahithya greeted old friends, and some people who had become Facebook penpals got to meet each other for the first time. The UM team was dead-tired after our long trip and the time difference, but the Liberian girls were so excited that it gave us a tiny bit of energy (but, I’ll admit, I fell asleep during the ride.) After dark, we finally came to our camp site, the Peace Corp Training Center in Kakata, a suburb of Monrovia.

The kitchen ladies were patiently waiting for us, with dinner hot and ready. Delicious spiced chicken, plantains, and green salad awaited us, with a side of pepper sauce. We all dug in as if we had starved for days, and finished up *convinced* that, if nothing else, the next 3 weeks would be delicious.
After dinner we got a short orientation around the Peace Corp campus and stashed our bags in our rooms. For all the families of the UM team reading, this is a NICE PLACE!!! Comfy dorm style rooms fit 12 girls each, 2 bathrooms with hot water, showers, and pressurized toilets, plenty of “pure” drinking water (cool for drinking & hot for tea), and most importantly for this generation– reliable power and wifi. The enclosed campus contains the dorm, a dining hall, housing for the staff, a classroom, a couple gazebos for outdoor lounging, and plenty of green space for outdoor activites, and– most importantly for our beloved parents–  24 hour security guards to keep your babies safe.
After our orientation, most of us, myself included, impatient for the hot water took cold showers and it was lights out on our first day. Sara and Sahithya, ever diligent, stayed up for a couple more hours to do some logistics planning. We were expecting to hit the ground running, with the first batch of Liberian camp participants arriving the next morning at 11:30am.
See how Day 1 goes in our next post!